Thursday, April 19, 2018

Lesson 399 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Italics/Underlining

Material that is italicized in print or by computer is underlined in typewritten or hand written work.
Italicize titles of books; of long plays and long poems; of periodicals, newspapers and magazines.
Instructions: Italicize those words which need italics in these sentences.
1. At the doctor’s office I read from two magazines, Time and Newsweek.
2. I take two daily newspapers, the Daily Herald and the Deseret News.
3. I love Dickens’s story of the French Revolution A Tale of Two Cities.
4. When in San Francisco, I saw the famous play Les Miserables.
5. Have you read the long poem The Idylls of the King?
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. At the doctor’s office I read from two magazines, Time and Newsweek.
2. I take two daily newspapers, the Daily Herald and the Deseret News.
3. I love Dickens’s story of the French Revolution A Tale of Two Cities.
4. When in San Francisco, I saw the famous play Les Miserables.
5. Have you read the long poem The Idylls of the King?

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/lesson-399-mechanics-punctuation.html

Lesson 398 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Italics/Underlining

Material that is italicized in print or by computer is underlined in typewritten or hand written work.
Italicize words used emphatically, but it should not be overdone. Example: You never agree with me.
Instructions: Italicize those words which you could emphasize in these sentences.
1. I do not like that at all.
2. That was an awesome movie.
3. I love your dress.
4. You always slur your words when you speak.
5. She overdoes everything.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. I do not like that at all.
2. That was an awesome movie.
3. I love your dress.
4. You always slur your words when you speak.
5. She overdoes everything.
(You could emphasize any word that you wanted, but again you should do so sparingly.)

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/lesson-398-mechanics-punctuation.html

Monday, April 16, 2018

Lesson 396 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Italics/Underlining

Material that is italicized in print or by computer is underlined in typewritten or hand written work.
Italicize foreign words not yet accepted as part of our language. Example: Do this tout de suite.
Instructions: Italicize those words which need italics in these sentences.
1. Sarah likes the expression tout a fait.
2. Have you ever noticed how tempus fugit?
3. Everyone has heard c’est la vie.
4. Tanto faz is my favorite foreign phrase.
5. Some people always have to have the dernier cri.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. Sarah likes the expression tout a fait.
2. Have you ever noticed how tempus fugit?
3. Everyone has heard c’est la vie.
4. Tanto faz is my favorite foreign phrase.
5. Some people always have to have the dernier cri.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/lesson-396-mechanics-punctuation.html

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Lesson 394 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Colons

Place a colon outside of quotation marks. Example: That reminds me of a line from “A Psalm of Life”: “Let us, then, be up and doing.”
Instructions: Place colons where needed.
1. When offered an alcoholic drink, one should remember Martial’s line in “A Total Abstainer” “No, I really don’t care for a drink.”
2. Do you remember the quote from “Carpe Diem” “This day’s thine own; the next may be denied.”
3. A man and a wife should use a line from “The Task” “With all thy faults, I love thee still.”
4. Do you agree with this line from “Lacon” “Imitation is the sincerest of flattery.”?
5. Whittier says in “Ichabod” “When faith is lost, when honor dies, The man is dead!”
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. When offered an alcoholic drink, one should remember Martial’s line in “A Total Abstainer”: “No, I really don’t care for a drink.”
2. Do you remember the quote from “Carpe Diem”: “This day’s thine own; the next may be denied.”
3. A man and a wife should use a line from “The Task”: “With all thy faults, I love thee still.”
4. Do you agree with this line from “Lacon”: “Imitation is the sincerest of flattery.”?
5. Whittier says in “Ichabod”: “When faith is lost, when honor dies, The man is dead!”

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/lesson-394-mechanics-punctuation-colons.html

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 386 – 390 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Colons

Instructions: Place colons where needed.
1. That statement can be found in Volume I pages 98-100 of The Raven The Life of Sam Houston.
2. Dear Harmon’s
3. I like what it says in James 520.
4. Dear Sirs
5. I will be here at 1200 P.M. for my money.
6. I enjoyed reading The Army of the Potomac A Stillness at Appomattoxby Bruce Catton.
7. I couldn’t find it in Volume IX pages 3-6.
8. Thanksgiving dinner will be at our place at 230 P.M.
9. A good college text was The American Constitution Its Origins and Development.
10. Revelation 62-8 talks about the four horsemen of the apocalypse.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. That statement can be found in Volume I: pages 98-100 of The Raven: The Life of Sam Houston.
2. Dear Harmon’s:
3. I like what it says in James 5:20.
4. Dear Sirs:
5. I will be here at 12:00 P.M. for my money.
6. I enjoyed reading The Army of the Potomac: A Stillness at Appomattoxby Bruce Catton.
7. I couldn’t find it in Volume IX: pages 3-6.
8. Thanksgiving dinner will be at our place at 2:30 P.M.
9. A good college text was The American Constitution: Its Origins and Development.
10. Revelation 6:2-8 talks about the four horsemen of the apocalypse.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/quiz-for-lessons-386-390-mechanics.html

Friday, April 6, 2018

Lesson 390 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Colons

Use a colon between the numbers referring to volume and the pages of books and magazines. Example: It is found in Volume II: pages 22-23.
Instructions: Place colons where needed.
1. That statement can be found in Volume X pages 198-200.
2. I found that information in Volume 54 pages 31-34.
3. Look in that magazine Volume 24 pages 3-4.
4. Volume VI pages 245-247 will have the information that you need.
5. Check the encyclopedia Volume 20 pages 105 -106.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. That statement can be found in Volume X: pages 198-200.
2. I found that information in Volume 54: pages 31-34.
3. Look in that magazine Volume 24: pages 3-4.
4. Volume VI: pages 245-247 will have the information that you need.
5. Check the encyclopedia Volume 20: pages 105 -106.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/lesson-390-mechanics-punctuation-colons.html

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Lesson 389 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Colons

Use a colon between the title and subtitle of a book. Example: The Wide World: A High School Geography
Instructions: Place colons where needed.
1. Have you examined for possible adoption Warriner’s English Grammar and Composition Complete Course?
2. The Advanced Composition A Book of Models for Writing has been used for many years.
3. I didn’t like Episodes in American History An Inquiry Approach as a history text.
4. Men and Nations A World History covers what we need very well.
5. The American Nation A History of the United States seems too advanced for our grade level.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. Have you examined for possible adoption Warriner’s English Grammar and Composition: Complete Course?
2. The Advanced Composition: A Book of Models for Writing has been used for many years.
3. I didn’t like Episodes in American History: An Inquiry Approach as a history text.
4. Men and Nations: A World History covers what we need very well.
5. The American Nation: A History of the United States seems too advanced for our grade level.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/04/lesson-389-mechanics-punctuation-colons.html