Thursday, February 1, 2018

Lesson 359 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma after long introductory prepositional phrases or two or more consecutive prepositional phrases. Examples: At the entrance to the cave, the guide gave us instructions. During those hot, boring summer days, time passed very slowly.
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. After the wreck into the pine tree the car was towed away.
2. Into the woods during the shower ran the black horse.
3. After the long and exhausting trip we finally arrived at our destination.
4. In the hall closet on the top shelf you will find the material I need.
5. Through the vast expanse of space the astronauts traveled continuously.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. After the wreck into the pine tree, the car was towed away.
2. Into the woods during the shower, ran the black horse.
3. After the long and exhausting trip, we finally arrived at our destination.
4. In the hall closet on the top shelf, you will find the material I need.
5. Through the vast expanse of space, the astronauts traveled continuously.

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/02/lesson-359-mechanics-punctuation-commas.html

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Lesson 355 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use commas to set off parenthetical expressions. Parenthetical expressions are words inserted in the main sentence but not necessary to the meaning. They interrupt the flow of the sentence. Common expressions used parenthetically are however, of course, on the other hand, in fact, for example, that is, by the way, after all, perhaps, indeed, also, too, nevertheless. These expressions are not always parenthetical. Examples: Lucy, on the other hand, reads little. He knows, perhaps, five answers to the questions.
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. The story that I just told you by the way is true.
2. My plan nevertheless was followed and succeeded.
3. Your plan on the other hand was rejected for good reasons.
4. I might suggest for example that you make some revisions.
5. You in fact should be moved to a different department.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. The story that I just told you, by the way, is true.
2. My plan, nevertheless, was followed and succeeded.
3. Your plan, on the other hand, was rejected for good reasons.
4. I might suggest, for example, that you make some revisions.
5. You, in fact, should be moved to a different department.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/01/lesson-355-mechanics-punctuation-commas.html

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Lesson 353 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off an appositive if not closely tied to the words it equals or identifies. Examples: Larry Millward, my best friend, will speak at the meeting. My brother Ken moved to Hawaii. (closely tied)
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. Fred James a soldier captured during World War II spoke at the assembly.
2. My sister Elaine died recently.
3. Paul the top student in his class was the valedictorian.
4. Small farming a very important occupation is disappearing.
5. We rode all day on Dot a very old and gentle horse.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. Fred James, a soldier captured during World War II, spoke at the assembly.
2. My sister Elaine died recently. (It is closely tied, but one could take Elaine as a noun of address if you don’t know her as the sister.)
3. Paul, the top student in his class, was the valedictorian.
4. Small farming, a very important occupation, is disappearing.
5. We rode all day on Dot, a very old and gentle horse.

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/01/lesson-353-mechanics-punctuation-commas.html

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Lesson 349 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use commas to separate a series of three or more phrases. Example: He ran down the hall, out the door, and into the yard. (The comma before the conjunction and is optional, but I prefer using it.)
Use no commas in a series when all items are joined by or, and, or nor.
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. The rain splashed against the house onto the sidewalk and into the street.
2. Through the trees around the cabin and down the valley roared the wind.
3. College is to gain knowledge to make new friends and to prepare for a career.
4. The cat climbed up the tree and out on a limb and finally onto the roof.
5. Munching on an apple listening to a recording and sitting on the couch Martha looked very happy.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. against the house, onto the sidewalk, and into the street.
2. Through the trees, around the cabin, and down the valley,
3. to gain knowledge, to make new friends, and to prepare for a career.
4. no commas needed
5. Munching on an apple, listening to a recording, and sitting on the couch,

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2018/01/lesson-349-mechanics-punctuation-commas.html

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 341 – 345 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. Most graciously
2. Dear Madam
3. Do you live at 431 North 500 West West Valley Utah 84098?
4. My birthday party is March 1 1976 at the golf course.
5. Monday February 2 is the day the groundhog looks for its shadow.
6. I lived at 368 Maple Avenue for a week.
7. May 1 was our wedding day.
8. Max Blaser Sr. is their neighbor in Tampa Florida.
9. Did you see Tom Jones Jr. at 430 East Plum Erda Colorado 35096 while on vacation?
10. During August all the leaves turn colors in Springfield Minnesota.
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. Most graciously,
2. Dear Madam: (a business letter)
3. 431 North 500 West, West Valley, Utah 84098?
4. March 1, 1976, at
5. Monday, February 2,
6. (no comma needed – only one part)
7. (no comma needed – only one part)
8. Max Blaser, Sr., / Tampa, Florida.
9. Tom Jones, Jr., / 430 East Plum, Erda, Colorado 35096, while

10. Springfield, Minnesota

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Lesson 345 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma after the complimentary close of a friendly or business letter. Example: Sincerely yours,
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these complimentary closings.
1. Very truly yours
2. Affectionately yours
3. Yours lovingly
4. Your best customer
5. Cordially
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. Very truly yours,
2. Affectionately yours,
3. Yours lovingly,
4. Your best customer,
5. Cordially,

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Lesson 344 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma after the salutation of a friendly letter. Example: Dear Fred,
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these salutations.
1. Dear Aunt Vi
2. Dear Sir
3. Dear Mother
4. Gentlemen
5. My choicest friend
–For answers scroll down.
Answers:
1. Dear Aunt Vi,
2. Dear Sir: (a business letter)
3. Dear Mother,
4. Gentlemen: (a business letter)
5. My choicest friend,

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://ift.tt/2AZLi2J